Folding and Origami-Based Structures

  Modular Origami Chair of Structures and Structural Design  

Using Origami Principles for Engineering Applications

Traditional Origami Chair of Structures and Structural Design

Origami sekkei stands for technical solutions which are based on origami principles.

It is predestined for the conception of structures as origami-based constructions combine several relevant technical properties. Folded structures based on bend-proof connected rigid plates generate very effective and material-saving forms so that these rigid foldings represent a lightweight construction system. Furthermore the advantage of kinematic foldings is that these structures are as well deployable as statically efficient as long as the rigid plates are arranged in an angle to one another.
Despite apparent advantages realized folded structures are rare in temporary architecture and functional foldable structures are quasi non existent.
To enable a targeted use of folded and foldable structures for technical applications one should start with the folding-specific basics. It is obvious to search for the essential design principles within the ancient art of Origami.

Traditional Origami is based on strict rules. The mostly figurative folding objects are created from only one single square sheet of paper, and only by folding. This approach is too restrictive for technical applications. However, less restrictive Origami categories have evolved from traditional Origami which include more possibilities for technical applications.
In Modular Origami several identical modules are composed to a three-dimensional structure. On this account it lends itself particularly for rigid folded structures as a source of inspiration.

 

Origami sekkei stands for technical solutions which are based on origami principles.

It is predestined for the conception of structures as origami-based constructions combine several relevant technical properties. Folded structures based on bend-proof connected rigid plates generate very effective and material-saving forms so that these rigid foldings represent a lightweight construction system. Furthermore the advantage of kinematic foldings is that these structures are as well deployable as statically efficient as long as the rigid plates are arranged in an angle to one another.
Despite apparent advantages realized folded structures are rare in temporary architecture and functional foldable structures are quasi non existent.
To enable a targeted use of folded and foldable structures for technical applications one should start with the folding-specific basics. It is obvious to search for the essential design principles within the ancient art of Origami.

Traditional Origami is based on strict rules. The mostly figurative folding objects are created from only one single square sheet of paper, and only by folding. This approach is too restrictive for technical applications. However, less restrictive Origami categories have evolved from traditional Origami which include more possibilities for technical applications.
In Modular Origami several identical modules are composed to a three-dimensional structure. On this account it lends itself particularly for rigid folded structures as a source of inspiration.

In this dissertation paper design projects and realized examples of rigid and deployable foldings as well as own and student projects are analyzed and evaluated. The specific challenges and opportunities of self-supporting rigid and convertible folded structures are carved out in order to enable a targeted use for technical applications, primarily in the field of architecture.

Objective of this dissertation is the categorization of for technical applications promising Origami patterns, the identification of possible tasks for Origami-based rigid and convertible folded supporting structures and the collocation of challenges.

As a result a process guide will be developed so that the use of folded and foldable structures will be simplified.

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Susanne Hoffmann

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